Inspiration:

Think of having to catch a fly, or a mosquito. The gesture requires energy, speed, and attention. When you have accomplished it, you slowly open your hand to see what you caught. When I start a new piece, I have no idea what I will do; I just focus, and try to feel what 'flies through the air': sensations, perceptions, emotions, moods, memories...

Then I start to draw quickly, with no thoughts about what I'm representing, and come up with the strokes that correspond to what I feel at the time (up / down, left / right, fast / slow, straight / curved).

Then I stop and look, trying to understand what I caught. Those signs are the DNA from which the work develops. In some cases they're only shapes in search of their evolution. In others they are figures, beings, moments of life.

Deep inside:

From these strokes I begin to develop the work. If I see forms (as one can see shapes in the clouds), I try to define them. If they seem to be saying something, I add other signs and other forms, trying to figure out the 'rules' of what is being developed. Even if all this comes from me, my attitude is that of an explorer who is facing an unknown territory. My intent is simply to go deeper and deeper. Each new work is a universe to be discovered and represented.

The space:

The space is no longer that of Renaissance perspective, an empty box where you place the objects and their actions, but that of the new physics, which comes from beings and their relationships. The reality is not only described by the three spatial dimensions, but by many dimensions entwined.

When I develop a work, I always try to change my vantage point; every point of view is a new dimension that affects the representation. So for example, if I look at it from an emotional point of view, the emotional dimension interweaves with the spatial dimensions, modifying them.


What interests me:

I enjoy life, nature, and the human being. I like trying to figure out who we are, and what we are doing. I like to represent the spectacle of the mystery of reality.


Expert Beginner:

I began my artistic career as a painter. I gave up painting after ten years to devote myself to digital art for 25 years. Although this is my third show at DAC Gallery in Los Angeles, I am not part of the art market or its system of criticism, I consider myself an expert-(re) beginner.

Los Angeles - June 15, 2013


Mario Canali